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Poll: Do You Trust Dr. Oz?

TV Dr. Mehmet Oz faced a Senate hearing on bogus weight-loss supplements.

Should the government crackdown on weight-loss supplements that make claims they can't backup?

Celebrity Dr. Mehmet Oz has faced criticism for extolling the virtues of what some say are bogus weight-loss supplements. Although Oz has not endorsed specific products, companies have jumped on any opportunity to capitalize on his words.

If Oz says green bean coffee extract might help with weight loss, expect a Pure Green Coffee to start selling nationwide.

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Oz appeared before a senate hearing on bogus weight-loss ads this week, NBC reported. "“I don’t get why you need to say this stuff because you know it’s not true,” Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat said at the hearing. “So why, when you have this amazing megaphone…why would you cheapen your show by saying things like that?”

McCaskill went on to say that when Oz features a product on his show he helps perpetuate a scam, boosts sales of bogus products and encourages others to follow suit.

However, Oz Countered that he believes in the items he has featured on the show and studied their effectiveness, Forbes reported.

Oz said that he does not sell any of the products and at times has sued companies that use his image, NBC News reported. Oz admitted that his statements on his show have sometimes allowed the unscrupulous to take advantage of him and the public.

"I never told them where to go to buy the products. I wanted to stay above the fray and I felt ... that if I talked about specific companies selling high quality products it would seem like I was supporting those companies," Oz said. "So that opened a huge market for folks to just go and make fake stuff."

The Oz kerfuffle mushroomed after the Federal Trade Commission sued Pure Green Coffee for using false weight loss claims and news sites to market itself.

The FTC stated that green coffee bean extract was touted on The Dr. Oz Show as a potent weight loss treatment. Although no specific product was mentioned, weeks later Pure Green Coffee began selling nationwide at a price of $50 for a one month supply.

"[Product websites] featured footage from The Dr. Oz Show, supposed consumer endorsements, and purported clinical proof that dieters could lose weight rapidly without changing their diet or exercise regimens," the FTC stated.

The Dr. Oz Show has aired since 2009 and was created by Oprah Winfrey. Oz first became famous by appearing on The Oprah Winfrey Show.

Forbes listed the top controversial items Oz has featured on his show including "Saffron Extract," which Oz touted as a "miracle appetite suppressant." Saffron extract is a spice used in Asian and Middle Eastern cooking.

Forbes points out that its impossible to know if any of the items touted by Oz actually work because of a lack of proper studies on them.


Maria Houser Conzemius June 25, 2014 at 12:36 PM
What's sad is that I have an elderly in-law with a fantastic figure, very fitness oriented and a Dr. Oz devotee. She believed in him and may still. Haven't seen her in a while so I'm not sure she still does. Dr. Oz has definitely let her down and so many others.
Steve M June 25, 2014 at 02:50 PM
He got the money, it's time to run, he just needed a strategy for an exit.
JMarsh June 26, 2014 at 09:58 AM
I have lost ALL respect for him. Lately he just seems to be pushing some crazy weight loss fad. I understand that one of the supplements he was promoting can damage your liver.
cookiepro2 June 26, 2014 at 12:12 PM
I guess Dr. Oz will have to stop the weight loss advice. I never saw anything extreme in my occasional viewing of his show. The most funny that I saw (with the audience screaming and jumping up and down like some have said) was a program about losing 20 lbs so you could fit in your swimsuit from years ago. An audience member would be chosen and run down to the stage holding their swimsuit and Dr. Oz would give her a weight loss tip, which turned out to be nothing earth-shattering or stuff you hadn't heard before. The one I remember was don't eat heavily as your evening meal, soup was suggested. At my gym last time, I had a choice between watching political or financial talking heads shows, music videos, sports rerun, or Dr. Oz talking about selecting whole grains foods at the grocery store. Personally, I found Dr. Oz the most useful out of the choices.
Ichabod June 29, 2014 at 08:13 AM
I've told my family and friends for years NOT to take everything he says as good, sound medical information. To me, he has always come off as a bit of a charlatan. So what has happened lately...where he comes off as a carnival huckster...doesn't surprise me. At all. And his explanation was just plain silly...basically saying he didn't know that he was being used....? Does his bank account reflect payments from companies for which he pushed their pills and potions?

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